This blog has been designed to provide information about the activities held at the social studies bilingual sections in CPI Tino Grandío (Guntín,Spain). The English language and Social Studies teachers have elaborated most of the resources you can see but our "auxiliares de conversa" also have their own page and posts. Therefore everyone is invited to have a look .

Wednesday, May 24, 2017

eTwinning sessions for Thursday

These will be the meetings to be held in each of the eTwinning groups belonging to the project, East or West, Home is Best on Thursday evening:

Group 1 from 18.00-18.45 (PL,SPAIN),19.00-19.45 (LT,U)
Group 2 from 18.45-19.30 (PL,SPAIN),19.45-20.30 (LT,U)
Group 3 from 19.30-20.15 (PL,SPAIN), 20.30-21.15 (LT, U)
Group 4 from 20.15-21.00 (PL, SPAIN), 21.15-22.00 (LT, U)

Go to the project Twinspace, then choose the Live page, and then the chatroom.


Monday, May 22, 2017

Subject & object questions

Most questions are object questions. They ask about an object.
  • Where do you live?
  • Who did you see? 
And there are also subject questions. Questions we ask to find out about the subject. These questions are asked using 'who', 'what' and 'which'.  
  • Who plays football in this class?
  • What happened?
  • Which machine did Marconi invent? 
You can take a look at the following chart of question forms:

FormExamples
Object Questions wh- + auxiliary + subject + main verbWhere do you live?
What will you do?
When is she coming?
Subject Questions wh- (=subject) + auxiliary + main verb

Notice that this structure is like affirmative sentence structure without the question word.
Who loves you?
Which car will arrive first?
What type of food costs less?




eTwinning activites for this last week

  1. First of all, write a message in the forum that corresponds to your group to communicate with the other teachers and students.
  2. Second, make sure you have done something in all the tasks that correspond to your group activities.
  3. Then, continue with the materials and write comments about the materials the other students have made to communicate with them. Try to be positive and constructive.
  4. Pay attention to the activities in bold type:
...................................................................................................................................................................
GROUP 1: Strange Foods

  • Spanish members: Alba Vázquez, Antía Vázquez, José Ángel López, Patricia García
  • Activities: 
    • Presentation about strange foods: choose a slide and write about the most strange foods you've tried.
    • Choose a place in the MAP and write a text about a strange food you've tried there
    • Use the map to locate strange foods that you have heard of that are strange all over the world, not just in your country.
  • Alternatively, help people in other groups with their activities.
  • Use the Group 1 Forum to communicate with the other students or write comments in the presentation (the comments will be deleted at the end). Write your opinion about the food the other students speak about: what you like or don't like.
GROUP 2:
  • Spanish members: Javier Pajón, Francisco Martínez, 
    • Activities: Presentation
    • Advice from Neringa, the teacher:
      • Create slides for:
        • People and their appearance in the future
        • Means of transport
        • Houses and buildings
        • Future schools
        • Forms of entertainment
      • You are welcome to write short descriptions, insert photos or your own drawings. Trust your imagination
      • Make your Voki avatar with your own text and paste the link in the eTwinning site.
      • Remember using Future Simple (will/ might+V) or Future Continuous (will +be+V-ing) or even Future Perfect (will+have+V-ed/ 3 form) in your slides to express yourselves. 
GROUP 3:

GROUP 4: Amusements in my hometown or neighbourhood.

Thursday, May 18, 2017

Tips for exam preparation

1. Study when sleepy.Bedtime stories are for kids. Instead of reading the Berenstain Bears, try studying for a few minutes right before hitting the hay. During sleep, the brain strengthens new memories, so there’s a good chance we’ll remember whatever we review right before dozing off. (Just try not to bring work into the actual bed, since it can make it harder to get a good night’s sleep.)

2. Space it out.
photo by Antonio Javier Guirao Silvente-INTEF
 
A new learning technique called “spaced repetition” involves breaking up information into small chunks and reviewing them consistently over a long period of time.  So don’t try to memorize the entire periodic table in one sitting—instead learn a few rows every day and review each lesson before starting anything new.

3. Tell a tale.
Turning the details you need to remember into a crazy story helps make the information more meaningful. For example, remember the order of mathematic operations PEMDAS this way: Philip (P) wanted to eat (E) his friend Mary (M) but he died (D) from arsenic (AS) poisoning.

4. Move around.
Research suggests studying the same stuff in a different place every day makes us less likely to forget that information.  Every time we move around (from the library to the coffee shop or the coffee shop to the toilet seat), we force the brain to form new associations with the same material so it becomes a stronger memory.

5. Switch it up.
Don’t stick to one topic; instead, study a bunch of different material in one sitting. This technique helps prepare us to use the right strategy for finding the solution to a problem. For example, doing a bunch of division problems in a row means every time we approach a problem, we know it’ll require some division. But doing a series of problems that require multiplication, division, or addition means we have to stop and think about which strategy is best.

6. Put yourself to the test.
Quizzing ourselves may be one of the best ways to prepare for the real deal.  And don’t worry about breaking a sweat while trying to remember the name of the 37th U.S. president (fyi, it’s Nixon): The harder it is to remember a piece of information in practice mode, the more likely we are to remember it in the future.

7. Write it out.
Put those third-grade penmanship lessons to good use. Research suggests we store information more securely when we write it out by hand than when we type it. Start by recopying the most important notes from the semester onto a new sheet of paper.

8. Make me wanna shout.
Reading information out loud means mentally storing it in two ways: seeing it and hearing it.  We just can’t guarantee you won’t get thrown out of the library.

9. Drink up.
Sorry, not that kind of drink. Instead, hit the local coffee shop for something caffeine-filled; there’s lots of research suggesting coffee (and tea) keeps us alert, especially when nothing seems more exciting than the shiny gum wrapper on the library floor. 

10. Treat yourself!
A healthy holiday cookie, a walk around the block, five minutes on Twitter—whatever floats your boat. Knowing there’s a little reward waiting for us at the end of just a few pages makes it easier to beat procrastination while slogging through a semester’s worth of notes.

11. Come together (right now).
Group work doesn’t fly with everyone, but for those who benefit from a little team effort, a study group’s the way to go. Pick a few studious pals and get together every few days to review the material. Put one person in charge of delegating tasks (snack duty, music selection) and keeping the group on target with its goals.

12. Take a time out.
Taking time to plan is one of the most important skills a student can have. Don’t just start the week with the vague goal of studying for a history exam—instead, break up that goal into smaller tasks. Pencil it in on the calendar like a regular class: For example, allot every day from 1 to 3 p.m. to review 50 years’ worth of info.

13. Say om.
Just before staring at a piece of paper for three hours, stare at a wall for three minutes. Research suggests meditation can reduce anxiety and boost attention span. While those studies focus mostly on regular meditation, there’s no harm in trying it out for a few minutes to calm pre-test jitters. 

14. Work it out.
Get stronger and brainier at the same time. Research has found just half an hour of aerobic exercise can improve our brain-processing speed and other important cognitive abilities. Jog a few laps around the block and see if you don’t come back with a few more IQ points.

15. Daaaance to the music.
As anyone who’s ever relied on Rihanna to make it through an all-night study session knows, music can help beat stress. And while everyone’s got a different tune preference, classical music in particular has been shown to reduce anxiety and tension. So give those biology notes a soundtrack and feel at least some of the stress slide away.

16. Own the omegas.
Omega-3 fatty acids, found in certain fish, nuts, and olive oil, are known for their brain-boosting potential. One study found that eating a combination of omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids before an exam reduced test anxiety. 

17. Gimme a break.
The KitKat guys said it, and so does science: Taking regular breaks can boost productivity and improve our ability to focus on a single task.  For a real productivity boost, step away from the screen and break a sweat during a midday gym sesh.

18. Doze off.
When there’s a textbook full of equations to memorize, it can be tempting to stay up all night committing them to memory (or trying to). But all-nighters rarely lead to an automatic A—in fact, they’ve been linked to impaired cognitive performance and greater sensitivity to stress.  In the days leading up to a big exam, aim to get those seven to nine hours a night so sleep deprivation doesn’t undo all the hard work you’ve put in.

19. Nix the 'net.
We’ve all been there, facing the siren call of a friend’s Facebook wall on the eve of a giant exam. If a computer’s necessary for studying, try an app (such as this one) that blocks the Internet for a short period of time and see how much more you get done.

20. Feel free to inhale.
Dusty old library again... or spa day? Research has found that catching a whiff of essential oils (like rosemary or lavender) can help calm down students before a big exam.  Skip the frantic last-minute review and try a few minutes of aromatherapy instead.

21. Practice your brain pose.
Hardcore yogis tend to have better cognitive abilities—especially attention span—than folks less familiar with down dog.  A few daily sun salutations may be all it takes to keep centered during finals period.

22. Learn what works.
Some people are early birds, some are night owls; some prefer to study with a pal, others need complete and total silence. Experiment to find what’s most effective for you, and then stick with it!